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A Tale for the Time Being

Ozeki, Ruth L. (Large Print - 2013 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
A Tale for the Time Being
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In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there's only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates' bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who's lived more than a century. A diary is Nao's only solace--and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox--possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao's drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future.
Authors: Ozeki, Ruth L.
Title: A tale for the time being
Publisher: Waterville, Maine :, Thorndike Press,, 2013.
Edition: Large print edition.
Characteristics: 697 pages (large print) ;,23 cm.
Content Type: text
Media Type: unmediated
Carrier Type: volume
Summary: In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there's only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates' bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who's lived more than a century. A diary is Nao's only solace--and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox--possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao's drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future.
ISBN: 9781594136887
1410460460
9781410460462
Statement of Responsibility: Ruth Ozeki
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (pages 687-690).
Subject Headings: Vancouver Island (B.C.) Fiction. Tokyo (Japan) Fiction. Women authors Fiction. Buddhist nuns Fiction. Teenage girls Fiction.
Genre/Form: Large type books.
Topical Term: Women authors
Buddhist nuns
Teenage girls
LCCN: 2013013272
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Jul 28, 2014
  • jenoteacher rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

My first read of Ruth Ozeki, and I liked it so much I plan to go back and read some of her older work. This book is plenty plot-driven, with it’s intertwined narratives of Nao and her extended family and Ruth and her life on the sparsely populated Cortes Island in B.C. But I was equally carried along by the thematic eddies that swirl through the book without resolution: suicide, bullying, hopelessness, moral considerations of war and the internet, the Pacific gyre. I learned about Buddhism, contemporary Japanese culture and terminology without feeling “schooled” (the parts about quantum theory were more forced). One gets the sense that everything in this writer’s life is worthy of examination, and she allows the mundane and magical to mix freely.

Jul 02, 2014
  • alleycat rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

This is a beautiful book, deserving all of its accolades, like dazzling, brilliant and unforgettable...I half listened to the audio (read by the author) and half read from the page. I highly recommend either format. Favourite literary character of all time: old Jiko. Oakville has the audio version, free and immediately available to all for streaming through Hoopla (access from homepage).

Jul 02, 2014
  • oO_Oo rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

I started reading this book, and initially thought "What the heck is going on here?" But I was glad I continued. I got sucked into the characters the more I read. They seemed believable and likeable, despite the somewhat mysterious premise. Ozeki's account of the Buddhist nun seems pretty good, not too orientalizing, not treating her like some odd exotic specimen. All in all, a worthwhile read.

Jun 03, 2014
  • JaclynA rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

This was a difficult read for me. I wanted to care about the characters, but couldn't seem to are enough about the characters. I found Nao to be one note, and Ruth wasn't any different. Not my cup of tea.

May 28, 2014
  • ehbooklover rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

This was a book of contradictions for me. Its content was at times disturbing and tragic, yet it was also uplifting and hopeful. I couldn’t put it down yet I wanted to. I was captivated by one of the protagonists, bored by the other. In short: a complicated and interesting title that is well worth a read!

Apr 16, 2014
  • aquadog rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A riveting novel that you can't put down. Probably one of the best books I have ever read. Enjoy!!

Pennie Clark Ianniciello, Costco's book buyer, has chosen A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki as her pick of the month for April 2014.

Mar 29, 2014
  • lpodell rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Read half liked girls voice, but just couldn't get interested enough to finish. May have been my restlessness

Mar 20, 2014
  • macierules rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A compelling, original story. She rather lost me near the end of the book.

Mar 07, 2014
  • KateHillier rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Author self insert, distressed sixteen year old American Japanese girl, a washed up diaries, quantum physics, and anarchist Buddhist nuns. It sounds like complete muddle of ideas and characters but it all fits together into a wonderful, and inventive, tale.

In our present, Ruth is a writer living on a sparsely populated island off the coast of BC with her husband. On the beach she finds a Hello Kitty lunchbox with a watch and a diary inside.

The diary, taking us nearly a decade into the past, belongs to sixteen year old Nao, a girl living in Tokyo who has decided to kill herself. Not before she tells the life story of her hundred and four year old great grandmother, though. She is the radical Buddhist nun.

The novel very easily divides Ruth's reading of Nao's diary with Nao's narration of her family life, school life, and time spent with her great grandmother. Between Nao's writing of her past and present, and Ruth reading it as past for her in our present, time and the future become difficult concepts as you work your way through the story but it is lovely. Very well thought out and very imaginative. I can guarantee that you've never read a book like this.

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Jun 26, 2014
  • bixby rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A Canadian writer finds a freezer bag containing a young Japanese girl's diary which might have washed across the Pacific after the tsunami. The chapters go back and forth between the writer and the diary pages, keeping you enthralled and wondering if you will ever know what became of her. Fascinating!

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Jun 26, 2014
  • bixby rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

From Le temps retrouve (Time Regained) by Marcel Proust, as quoted in A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki:
"In reality, every reader, while he is reading, is the reader of his own self. The writer's work is merely a kind of optical instrument, which he offers to the reader to permit him to discern what, without the book, he would perhaps never have seen in himself. The reader's recognition in his own self of what the book says is the proof of its truth."

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Dec 02, 2013
  • Codexthespius rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Tsunami waves In Japan 2011

Did these waves carry a diary across the Pacific to Canada? The story is god even if you don't believe it could happen.

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