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Inferno

A Novel
Brown, Dan (Book - 2013 )
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
Inferno
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Item Details

In the heart of Italy, Harvard professor of symbology Robert Langdon is drawn into a harrowing world centered on one of history's most enduring and mysterious literary masterpieces: Dante's Inferno. Against this backdrop, Langdon battles a chilling adversary and grapples with an ingenious riddle that pulls him into a landscape of classic art, secret passageways, and futuristic science.
Authors: Brown, Dan, 1964-
Title: Inferno
a novel
Publisher: New York : Doubleday, c2013.
Edition: 1st ed.
Characteristics: x, 461 p. :,ill. ;,25 cm.
Summary: In the heart of Italy, Harvard professor of symbology Robert Langdon is drawn into a harrowing world centered on one of history's most enduring and mysterious literary masterpieces: Dante's Inferno. Against this backdrop, Langdon battles a chilling adversary and grapples with an ingenious riddle that pulls him into a landscape of classic art, secret passageways, and futuristic science.
ISBN: 0385537859
9780385537858
Statement of Responsibility: Dan Brown
Subject Headings: Italy Fiction. Florence (Italy) Fiction. Cryptographers Fiction. Dante Alighieri, 1265-1321. Inferno Fiction. Langdon, Robert (Fictitious character) Fiction.
Genre/Form: Mystery fiction.
Suspense fiction.
Topical Term: Cryptographers
Langdon, Robert (Fictitious character)
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In Italy, Harvard professor Robert Langdon is drawn into a harrowing world centered on one of history's most enduring literary masterpieces: Dante's Inferno.


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Robert Langdon died at the end of the book now I think I'm going to have to kill Tom Hanks.

Jul 21, 2014
  • alkabhushan rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Loved this one for the description and details for amazing places. I couldn't keep it down.

Jul 15, 2014
  • MaryMaryJ rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

Very predictable but with interesting world topics and history in the midst of entertaining drama.

Jul 10, 2014
  • KerstinM rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Predictable? Yes, definitely. But easy summer read. Hard to put down.

Jun 15, 2014
  • sarakoske rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Formulatic? Of course. But face it, Dan Brown's is a really fun formula. This book fit that perfectly-- an adventure through European history, art, & literature that will keep you on the edge of your seat. Granted, don't try to read more than 2 Dan Brown books in any 6 month period, but as long as they're spaced out, his books are such exciting reads, and Inferno is no exception.

This book is very hard to read and in my opinion by far the worst of the Dan Brown novels

May 25, 2014
  • pbrichstein rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Very good book. Could be read into as a political type novel. Uses real statistics to add to the story.

Definitely a good read. In a tongue-in-cheek sort of way you've got to be amazed that Dan Brown can play out and resolve the whole adventure in roughly the space of two days! Given the jet lag involved in hopping between three different countries I'd be out for a week. On another note however, Dan Brown is superb in capturing the colours, sounds, scents and sites of the three cities -- Florence, Venice, and Istanbul -- in which the novel plays out. Even if the reader may not favour another Prof. Langdon adventure, Inferno is a great travel guide, as good as a Rough Guide, Lonely Planet, etc. Finally, I thought the premise of genetic engineering as a way to resolve the impending world over- population crisis provides a really edgy culmination to the book. It's not quite a doomsday theme, but reading the book does make you reflect seriously on the merits of the solution the "bad" guy has created. I wish Brown could have expanded on that a little more throughout the book rather than packing it all at the end. Four out of five stars for me.

Mar 11, 2014
  • royyap1 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Pretty typical Dan Brown writing, quite a few plot twist and the usual character development and our standard favorite Professor Langdon as our hero. Dan brown definitely changed the heroine Sienna Brooks this time around, a little less on the romantic tension between Professor Langdon and Sienna. Dan Brown did a very good research I believe on the Dante's Inferno and the whole mystery chase to find Dante's Inferno and in the end it actually addressed a very poignant point about the whole human over population. I'd definitely recommend this as a read if you're into fiction with a splash of action adventure / mystery solving and Dan Brown's beloved Professor Langdon.

Feb 01, 2014
  • patty_at_thelibrary rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

I liked this book - was pleasantly surprised, given all of the hype and media attention.
Found myself looking up the physical locations mentioned in the story online.
Good story.

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Nov 18, 2013
  • IGOR FABRICHNIKOV rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

IGOR FABRICHNIKOV thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

Sep 23, 2013
  • GinaMWright rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

GinaMWright thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Summary

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Renowned Harvard professor Robert Langdon is once again put into a web of another art conspiracy scheme, this time done by a mysterious virologist who wants to hide his plot to destroy the world in Dante's The Divine Comedy.

Jun 21, 2013
  • andrewgraphics rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

Internationally renowned and hunky Harvard professor of symbology Robert Langdon is once again at the center of an art-related plot, this time by a narcissistic virologist who has hidden his plan to destroy humanity in the seminal work of Dante.
Oh, stop, you know you want to read this. Unfortunately, like most of Brown's other books, this is quite short on plot and heavy on running. One thing I noticed is Brown paces his books like really long TV shows: each chapter is a short scene which ends with a little cliff-hanger. Would only recommend this to people who *really* like Brown's books.

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May 25, 2014
  • pbrichstein rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who maintain their neutrality in times of moral crisis.

Sep 18, 2013
  • jimg2000 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

“Consider this. It took the earth’s population thousands of years — from the early dawn of man all the way to the early 1800s—to reach one billion people. Then, astoundingly, it took only about a hundred years to double the population to two billion in the 1920s. After that, it took a mere fifty
years for the population to double
again to four billion in the 1970s. As
you can imagine, we’re well on track
to reach eight billion very soon. Just
today, the human race added
another quarter-million people to
planet Earth. A quarter million. And
this happens every day—rain or
shine. Currently, every year, we’re
adding the equivalent of the entire
country of Germany.”

Sep 18, 2013
  • jimg2000 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

“He once described himself as being trapped on a ship where the passengers double in number every hour, while he is desperately trying to build a lifeboat before the ship sinks under its own weight.” She paused. “He
advocated throwing half the people
overboard.”

Sep 18, 2013
  • jimg2000 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Dante:

The darkest places in hell
are reserved for those
who maintain their neutrality
in times of moral crisis.

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