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2001

A Space Odyssey
(DVD - 2007 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
2001
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Item Details

A space voyage to Jupiter erupts in disaster when the ship's computer goes mad.
Title: 2001
a space odyssey
[videorecording (DVD)]
Publisher: [United States] : Warner Home Video, 2007.
Edition: Special ed.Widescreen ed.
Characteristics: 2 videodiscs (149 min.) :,sd., col. ;,4 3/4 in.
Notes: Includes commentary by Keir Dullea and Gary Lockwood; Documentary - 2001: The Making Of A Myth; Four featurettes; 2001: FX and early conceptual artwork; Audio-only interview with Stanley Kubrick; Theatrical trailer.
Summary: A space voyage to Jupiter erupts in disaster when the ship's computer goes mad.
Audience: Rating G.
MPAA rating G.
Awards & Distinctions: Academy Awards, 1969: Oscar - Best Effects, Special Visual Effects (Stanley Kubrick)
Additional Contributors: Dullea, Keir - 1936-
Lockwood, Gary - 1937-
Kubrick, Stanley
Clarke, Arthur C. - 1917-2008 - (Arthur Charles),
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Warner Home Video (Firm)
ISBN: 1419830589
9781419830587
Statement of Responsibility: Metro-Goldwyn- Mayer ; produced and directed by Stanley Kubrick ; screenplay by Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke
Credits: Director of photography, Geoffrey Unsworth ; film editor, Ray Lovejoy.
Performers: Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester, Daniel Richter.
System Details: DVD.
Other Language: English or French dialogue; French or Spanish subtitles.
English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing.
Subject Headings: Twenty-first century Drama. Computers Drama. Human-computer interaction Drama.
Genre/Form: Science fiction films.
Video recordings for the hearing impaired
Feature films.
Science fiction films
Action and adventure films.
Feature films.
Fantasy films
Topical Term: Twenty-first century
Computers
Human-computer interaction
Publisher No: 79191
MARC Display»

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Apr 25, 2014
  • Bazooka_Joe rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

46 relatively brief years have now passed since this monolith of Sci-Fi psychedelia was released. Space travel and man's technological advances certainly haven't reached anywhere near to what was foreseen back then by author, Arthur C. Clarke. But, all the same, Clarke's wishful thinking combined with Stanley Kubrick's awesome vision of the future certainly produced a startling cinematic experience. ~~~ Even though 2001's story-line may be flawed like the pitted surface of the moon (and plot-coherency can also be called into question), 2001 still remains a spectacle of visual brilliance. This film's hard-to-beat special effects set new standards back in 1968. ~~~ In these hard-edged, progressively hi-tech decades that have followed 2001, this Sci-Fi milestone still holds up relatively well (that's, of course, if one's willing to give it a fair chance). ~~~ Yep. Good, old Stanley Kubrick - Gone, but not forgotten.

Mar 29, 2014
  • red_cobra_1049 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

I found a recommendation for this movie so I watched it. From first glance, I thought it was quite boring. But after some time, I learned to fully appreciate the true beauty of it.(They even show Ipad models in 1968)!

One of the rare movies that actually improves during a second viewing.

Mar 26, 2013
  • veganboy rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

I had never seen this until recently. Considering when it was released, this was very well made. The thing about "art" is that it's often how much one can personally draw from the art. I'm sure that sci-fi nerds love it, but for me, I did not
"wish I had seen this years ago".
Only one viewing of it within my lifetime will suffice.

Jan 05, 2013
  • sdelao rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I LOVE this film! And agree with Cannes: I noticed the iPad like devices on the spaceship as well...and this movie was made in 1968. Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke were waaaay ahead of their time! I love the soundtrack, direction, cinematography....all of it. I highly recommed this movie.

Dec 17, 2012
  • Monolith rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

"An epic drama of adventure and exploration." (-Theatrical release poster.) An amazing $10.5 million (in 1968!) masterpiece co-written by Arthur C. Clarke & Stanley Kubrick (producer/director extraordinaire), made almost entirely in England, using both the studio facilities of MGM's subsidiary "MGM British" and those of Shepperton Studios. It was nominated for four Academy Awards, and received one for its pioneering visual effects. In 1991, it was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. The ethereal musical score is haunting. The monkey costumes were cheezy (lol). I know, it was 1968... probably loaners from "Planet Of The Apes". Speaking of '68, I wouldn't be surprised if the fourth chapter: "Jupiter And Beyond The Infinite" had L.S.D. influenced audiences in mind... (e.g. "A Clockwork Orange"!). In closing, a groundbreaking, dazzling piece of work with minimal dialogue that every sci-fi fan should experience. FIVE STARS.

it's Arthur C. Clarke's magnum opus, all symbolical. It's not about space travel, it's about man's progress from ape man to the scientific age, when the smart astronaut of spaceship earth disables the genetically coded progorammed law of aging. The computer Hal represents the coded genetic program. Not a very good film, because the symbolical story is forced and not really good as a scenario. There are other symbols in it too, but they are meant for insiders, who understand them. The public has no idea what it's about. The secret societies that kept this idea of becoming ageless "gods" one day, are represented in this story by the stone block, which is so monolythic and strong it can't even be scratched. In 2003 a Commission of Bush Jr. wrote a report about the planned use of Bio-Technology for creating an "ageless body," among others. The title of the Report was: "Beyond Therapy - Bio Technolgy for the Pursuit of Happiness." It mentions plans for creating a peaceful and highly perfomant, selfless, new humanoid worker for the future. Not to serve us, but to replace us, ape-like men of today. I love pigeons for their lovely peaceful nature and behavior - people should be like them. But humans in general are selfish wild animal-like in their instincts and behavior. Just today, as my pigeons were eating on the ground peacefully, a young mother and husband with a stroller (and child in it) came by on the sidewalk, and they suddenly ran with the stroller right into the middle of the peacefully eating pigeon flock, and they laughed like crazy at their flight. These people have no respect for other living things, how do they expect to be respected themselves? A replacement of this animal-like man is justified and necessary to live in harmony with nature and with each other. The time of the old type of man is over, the Crowd just doesn't realize it yet. The new type of man is in the making, and a symbolic presentation of it is the first Superman movie: this civilization is to perish and a new, good and strong man is sent forward into the future.

Akirakato in his comment writes generalities, I guess he has not understood what this movie is about. Because this movie is from the book of Arthur C. Clarke, a famous occultist, or I should say, scientist-futurologist (Nobel Prize winner), who uses the symbolic language of the ancient and modern Wise Men. In that language everything means something else - a coded language, which only insiders understand, the public has no idea of the real meaning. The meaning of the book/film is the ancient occultic agenda of "Wizards" to become immortal, as they say in the Harry Potter story: "The last enemy that shall be conquered is Death." The Harry Potter story is the same double talk as this Clarke-Kubrick film. The computer program of the "saceship" (Earth) is the natural genetic coding of aging, and the astronaut who disables that program overcomes the natural law (using bio-technology), thereby becoming a God himself. This is the way the secret societies put in front of the public their own agenda and enjoy the dumb incomprehenstion of the Crowd. In reality these coded, symbolic writings and films are done for the insiders themselves, who understand them, while the Crowd of the "living dead" "look and don't see, hear and don't understand," as the Jesus figure says in the New Testament. Becasue the religious books also are full of symbolic meanings, as they were written by the same Wise Men as those of today.

Jun 25, 2012
  • OverCookedCookies rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

How is this happening.....this movie is grabbing me in its clutches. The first time you watch this movie, you will think its a piece of crap (I sure did). But once you watch this film a second time, it will automatically be on your top 5 movies. Don't listen to people who said it was boring (because they obviously have not seen it twice!). Its exciting with the character HAL 9000 because he is very interesting and he's a computer! Also the electronic gadgets that they use in this movies look like they're from 2012 not 1968!!!! Anyways if you take out this DVD from the library, don't haul out the popcorn. Save the goodies for the second time you watch it. Its very stimulating and will make you think about it until you drop dead. The only thing I don't really like is the monolith. Its a black bar that appears everywhere, but anyways it's a magnificent mystery-sci fi-adventure film that's truly amazing. 5 stars!!!

Jun 22, 2012
  • aaa5756 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Very well done movie I would recommend this movie for all to see. No fast forwarding on this one. A++ DVD

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Jul 14, 2011
  • KELINALAHMI rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

KELINALAHMI thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

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Oct 26, 2009
  • codylink rated this: 0.5 stars out of 5.

Can I rate it less that 1/2 of a star?

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Dec 17, 2012
  • Monolith rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

HAL: "I am putting myself to the fullest possible use, which is all I think that any conscious entity can ever hope to do."

Dec 17, 2012
  • Monolith rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Dave Bowman: Hello HAL. Do you read me HAL? HAL: Affirmative, Dave... I read you. Dave: Open the pod bay doors HAL. HAL: I'm sorry Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that. Dave: What's the problem? HAL: I think you know what the problem is just as well as I do. Dave: What are you talking about HAL? HAL: This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it. Dave: I don't know what you're talking about HAL. HAL: I know that you and Frank were planning to disconnect me, and I'm afraid that's something I cannot allow to happen. Dave: Where the hell did you get that idea, HAL? HAL: Dave, although you took very thorough precautions in the pod against my hearing you, I could see your lips move. Dave: Alright HAL. I'll go in through the emergency airlock. HAL: Without your space helmet, Dave? You're going to find that rather difficult. Dave: HAL, I won't argue with you anymore! Open the doors! HAL: Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.

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2001: A Space Odyssey trailer

Jul 14, 2011
  • KELINALAHMI rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

2001 Trailer

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