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The Book Thief

Zusak, Markus (Book - 2007 )
Average Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.
The Book Thief


Item Details

Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel--a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.
Authors: Zusak, Markus
Title: The book thief
Publisher: New York :, Alfred A. Knopf,, 2007, c2005.
Edition: 1st Knopf trade pbk. ed.
Characteristics: 552, 15 p. :,ill. ;,21 cm.
Notes: Contains a Readers' Guide and conversation with the author at end.
Summary: Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel--a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.
Local Note: Accelerated Reader AR 51 10180
NEXTBOOK
Additional Contributors: White, Trudy
ISBN: 9780385754729
0375842209
9780375842207
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Amazing. My only problem with this book is that when Rudy Steiner died, I cried (sort of). Rudy is a powerful charecter. READ THIS BOOK.

Report This Apr 15, 2014
  • tonatina rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Great book! Having Death as the narrator was unusual, but very interesting. The story made me laugh and cry....I absolutely loved it!

Report This Apr 12, 2014
  • Memawrayne rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Very unusual way to present a story but interesting. The author showed the suffering of the average German during WW11, yet still reminded the reader of the tragedy of the Holocaust.

I loved it so much that I spent the whole day reading and finishing it. I enjoyed the book far more than the movie.

Such a good book, such a lousy movie.

I really liked reading this book. It took me a a few chapters to really understand and get used to the style of writing, but it was well worth it. I definitely recommend it!

Report This Mar 13, 2014
  • LaughingOne rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

I didn't care for Death being the third person narrator. I believe he was trying for some kind of philosophical overtone, but it didn't work for me. And I didn't like all the foreshadowing he gave -- I'm not taking that soul yet, he has another 4 months... things like that. I did make it through the entire book but it took me a long time. And now I don't think I want to watch the movie.

Report This Mar 05, 2014
  • vanilla_skie77 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I thought this book was very well written. The author wrote it in a different perspective, in a different style. It was told by the Grim Reaper, Death. This reminded me of Neil Gaiman's Sandman series. It stuck true to World War II facts and history, and had a ton of personality with the characters and the seriousness of it. It had comic relief as well, and I silently cheered for the characters throughout the book. I loved how it went into great details about the characters, the times, and places. The story of Max, the Jew, who is kept hidden in the basement, reminded me of Anne Frank's Diary.

Report This Mar 03, 2014
  • mayapell rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Very good book! Agreed, it was a little confusing for me in the beginning but stay with it, as it gets easier to read once the story starts taking shape and more understandable by the third chapter. Then you can re-read the beginning and it will make more sense. Very sad in some places, I cried about 4 times, but very moving and well told story from the narrator who is death, personified. Loved this book!

Report This Feb 14, 2014
  • jeanner222 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Liesl is a young girl living with a foster family in Nazi Germany. Her life is not easy. She is living in a new place with a new family. Her brother died en route to the new home. Liesl is lonely and struggling. Her foster parents, the Hubermanns, are different from Liesl’s parents. Rosa is not exactly a nurturing figure. Fortunately, Hans is a little softer than Rosa. Liesl enjoys rolling cigarettes with Hans and listening to him play the accordion. Of course, Liesl’s struggles with her new family and new school are further complicated by the war being waged in Europe. The Hubermanns do not support the Nazi agenda, and they even hide a young Jewish man, Max, in their basement. Liesl befriends Max, and her confusing world suddenly expands. Narrated by Death (really, this is too contrived for me), The Book Thief is the story of Liesl, her family, and her friends during WWII. It is the story of a girl who finds solace in words and shares it with others. Unlike many novels set in this period, The Book Thief examines the lives of Germans, not Jews, during the war. Readers are given a sense of what it was like to live in Germany and oppose the Nazis. I liked this novel and its message quite a bit, but the narrative voice (Death) really annoyed me. I think Liesl’s story could have been much more compelling if told in the first person.

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jzhu728 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

Report This Nov 10, 2013
  • one_direction_13 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

one_direction_13 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

Report This Jul 19, 2013
  • Draw rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Draw thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

Alexac thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

Report This Apr 09, 2013
  • Asetlur rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Asetlur thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

HermioneGrangerRocks thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

Report This Feb 17, 2013
  • andrewzo rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

andrewzo thinks this title is suitable for 17 years and over

Abdillahi Nur thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

Report This Sep 07, 2012
  • SpeakTheAbsoluteTruth rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

SpeakTheAbsoluteTruth thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Jeroman thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

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Summary

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Report This Jul 19, 2013
  • Draw rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

"It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . . . Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau. This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to feed the soul."

Report This Jul 05, 2012
  • pojo6865 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Introduction: During WWII in 1939, Liesel and her brother are being taken to Molching, Germany with her mother, to live with foster parents. Sadly, her little brother dies on the train and is buried along the way there. This is when Liesel steals her first book, (Gravedigger’s Handbook- marks brother’s death). Entering her new home, Liesel finds most comfort and love with her new father- Hans Hubermann. Stealing books becomes somewhat of a hobby now, as it motivates her to learn to read and write. An important aspect of the introduction is the hint at Liesel’s background. She learns more about why, how, and what actually happened to her real parents. As of right now, all we know is that Hans is gentle/welcoming, and that Rosa may need anger-management classes. Rising Action: After the book-burning celebration for Hitler’s birthday, Liesel realizes that the Nazis are responsible for all of her losses. At this point, she steals another book (the Shoulder Shrug- marks hatred for Hitler). Along with her friendship with Rudy Steiner, good friend from school, she forms a relationship with the mayor’s wife, who lets Liesel in her library every time she comes by for laundry (as she saw Liesel’s interest in stealing the Shoulder Shrug). But when the wife, Ilsa, ends the laundry service, Liesel is infuriated and begins stealing her books. Eventually though, forgiveness awakes due to a complicated friendship that was always present. Back to Rudy, he’s a fearless boy with lemon hair, and he wants Liesel’s lips. Remember that. Meanwhile, there’s the story of Hans Hubermann and his great friend during WWI who saved Hans’s life and died in consequence. This friend happens to be a Jew, and his son is now seeking help with Hans, in hiding from the Nazis. Expectedly, the family is worried about the potential situation, since the act of housing a Jew in WWII was life-jeopardising. But they do, and Max turns out to be very friendly. So does Rosa. Especially Hans. Climax: A series of little events tagged along for the journey to the climax. But, everything explodes when Max leaves for safety. Liesel is…she’s devastated. But, there is worse to come. He’s seen in a hoard of Jews on their way to Dachau, and this just tears the girl apart. Soon after, Ilsa gave Liesel a blank book. This saves the girl’s life, keeping her busy writing in the basement in an unexpected bombing. Sadly, all of Liesel’s loved ones die in their sleep. Death takes his time picking up Rosa, Hans, Kurt... Oh yeah, Rudy dies too, but at least he gets his long-awaited kiss from Liesel. Too bad it happens like this. Falling Action: Well, the climax occurs late in the book, and in consequence, there’s not much to be said in this section. But, it is notable that Liesel drops her book in shock of everybody’s death (book = her life-story painted on the beloved blank pages from Ilsa). Death picks it up. The book is to be remembered. The mayor’s wife takes her in. Liesel talks with Alex Steiner. About Rudy. I’m sorry, am I being too specific? It’s...well...just that......I love this part. Resolution: In the epilogue, Liesel dies. But, she has lived a happy life with a husband and offspring. We also see Liesel being reunited with Max, having miraculously survived his sentence at Dachau. The book ends under a fulfilling atmosphere as Death gives back her book and takes her soul away. “I am haunted by humans.”

Report This Jan 20, 2012
  • SharonWarren rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I started this book and it just didn't keep my attention, so gave it up, for a time. It had been so highly recommended I knew it would come back on my list. When next I picked it up I was ready for it and absolutely loved it. An engrossing, warm, and thoughtful read about a very difficult time.

Report This Aug 11, 2010
  • FrostyViolette rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

An amazing story that takes place during World War II in Nazi Germany. Death narrates the story of a young girl named Liesel and her life living with her foster parents, the Hubermanns.

Notices

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Report This Jan 03, 2014
  • GreenElephantGirl rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Other: Film is released in New Zealand 9th January.

Frightening or Intense Scenes: They get bombed several times. You can't see alot, but it may frighten younger children. And like i stated above, some fist fights.

Violence: Just alot of fighting. There are some fist fights and Germans beating people. There are also dead bodies shown.

Report This Sep 23, 2013
  • mariednguyen rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Other: Release date November 15, 2013 (USA)

Report This Sep 02, 2011
  • lukeooo2 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: german and english swearing but not to bad.

Report This May 02, 2011
  • Cathy Jing rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: Only kissing.

Report This May 02, 2011
  • Cathy Jing rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: Swearing in German and English

Report This May 02, 2011
  • Cathy Jing rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Violence: Bombs, whipping etc.

Report This Jan 13, 2009
  • Twoey Gray rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: Swear words are used in both English and German.

Report This Jan 13, 2009
  • Twoey Gray rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Violence: Some extremely graphic death and fight scenes.

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Quotes

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Report This Jan 07, 2014
  • Trelystus rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

***HERE IS A SMALL FACT*** You are going to die.

Report This Jan 03, 2014
  • GreenElephantGirl rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

''Do you still play the accordion?''

Report This Aug 20, 2013
  • blue_bear_1017 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

The only thing worse than a boy who hates you: a boy that loves you.

Report This Jul 19, 2013
  • Draw rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

“Together, they would watch everything that was so carefully planned collapse, and they would smile at the beauty of destruction.”

Report This Nov 10, 2012
  • becker rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

“The only thing worse than a boy who hates you: a boy that loves you.” ― Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

Report This Nov 08, 2012
  • erumble rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

"I've seen so many young men over the years who think they're running at other young men. They are not. They're running at me." (p.245 LP version) said by Death.

Report This Aug 11, 2012
  • Violet_Butterfly_31 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

"Look at the colors," Papa said. It's hard not to like a an who not only notices the colors, but speaks them. - Markus Zusak

Report This Jul 05, 2012
  • pojo6865 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

She leaned down and looked at his lifeless face and Liesel kissed her best friend, Rudy Steiner, soft and true on his lips. He tasted dusty and sweet. He tasted like the regret in the shadows of trees and in the glow of the anarchist’s suit collection. She kissed him long and soft, and when she pulled herself away, she touched his mouth with her fingers. Her hands were trembling, her lips were fleshy, and she leaned in once more, this time losing control and misjudging it. Their teeth collided on the demolished world of Himmel Street.

Report This Jun 26, 2012
  • Yahong_Chi rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Point five: Somewhere, far down, there was an itch in his heart, but he made it a point not to scratch it. He was afraid of what might come leaking out. (p. 60)

Report This Jun 26, 2012
  • Yahong_Chi rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Mr. Steiner was a remarkably polite man under normal circumstances. Discovering one of his children smeared charcoal black on a summer evening was not what he considered normal circumstances. “The boy is crazy,” he muttered, although he conceded that with six kids, something like this was bound to happen. At least one of them had to be a bad egg. (p. 58)

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Extended Clip

Extended scene called "Why would I want to kiss you"

Report This May 18, 2011
  • Harriet_the_Spy rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Interview with Markus Susak about The Book Thief

Find it at HPPL

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